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Vol. 1 No. 2 (2021): The New England Journal of Relational and Systemic Practice: Telehealth During the Pandemic
					View Vol. 1 No. 2 (2021): The New England Journal of Relational and Systemic Practice: Telehealth During the Pandemic

Amidst a global pandemic that has taken loved ones from their families, taken us away from our commuting routines and patients, and has literally encapsulated us in our homes, the opportunity to utter the words “post-pandemic” feels like a momentary relief. This relief is then followed by questions and reflections about what life will look like returning to our new “normal”, how we will continue to challenge historical inequities in mental health care, how to address worries about the health risks of returning while there is still a pandemic, what to do about vicarious trauma and clinician burnout, and simultaneously confronting a concurrent racial pandemic.

For psychotherapists, one of the primary shifts has been the practice of teletherapy. This journal explores the impact of teletherapy for professionals during the last year, and ideates about the pros and cons of using telehealth modules to continue working with couples, relationships, and families in the future.

Published: 2021-05-19

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One of the gaps in information for therapists, and therapeutic treatment, is that we do not know what other therapists in our own community are doing. NEJRSP is hoping to bridge that gap by giving therapists a vehicle and a voice to talk about what works. 

In practical terms, it would be interesting to know:

  • How are therapists and their clients in Chelsea and Lawrence are coping during this pandemic?

  • How are therapists adapting to Zoom meetings? What are the elements of Zoom that are therapeutic? What are the limitations of Zoom to the therapeutic process and the problems of risk?

  • Has anyone found a way forward with overworked parents struggling with their own work while providing education and child care at the same time?

  • Has anyone begun to effectively treat the vicarious trauma of our health care workers?

  • How are therapists talking about race, identity, and sexuality with their clients now? How are clients talking about race, identity, and sexuality with their therapists?

  • How are community mental health therapists, directors, and administrators adapting systemically to the pandemic?

  • When police officers attend therapy, do they talk about their perspective on Black Lives Matter? What do they say?

These are local issues, and much more.

Let us publish your ideas about your own day to day work, and the insights you gain from month to month, and year to year.